Your Sunrise, FL Dentist

Opening Hours : Mon - Thur 8:30am to 5:00pm ; Fri 8:30am to 2:00pm
  Contact : (954) 741-5006

Get Healthy Gums & Teeth With The Right Dental & Root Canal Treatment

Root canal treatment FAQ

Our tooth structure is comprised of two parts: the crown, which is the visible part of our white; and the root that holds or supports the tooth. The structural components of a tooth are: hard outer covering or the tooth enamel, dentine that is present under the enamel, cementum and dental pulp. The dental pulp is the tender tissue located at the tooth centre. It contains blood vessels and nerves. When the tooth is infected or decayed or it is broken due to any trauma, then the bacteria inside our mouth infect the dental pulp, destroying the soft tissues. If proper care is not taken, the infection will spread down affecting the root canal. The tissues abiding the tooth then turn red and inflamed and this may cause toothache. Root canal treatment in these cases becomes a must.

Procedure required for a root canal treatment

A small hole is made via a drilling machine to reach to the pulp chamber from the top of the tooth. The root canal treatment process involves removal of the decayed pulp along with the tooth’s nerve surgically. The chamber is then washed and cleaned properly. The area is then sealed with cement. Usually, a crown is placed on top of the tooth surface to protect it from further damage and give it an improved look and feel. Normally, a person requires visiting their dentist from one to three times depending upon the condition of the root canal. The first visit is mostly an examination of the tooth and how deep the decay is with the help of n X-ray. The X-ray allows a better vision of the inner portion of the tooth so that the doctor can provide the required treatment and capping.

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Get Freedom From Discolored Teeth With Teeth Whitening Procedures

Today’s world is obsessed with the beautiful things, certainly you also want to follow the race and not lack behind. To stay ahead in the race, all of your beauty attributes such as hair, skin, teeth should be glowing. You can use products in the market to improve your hair quality or to get glowing skin, but for shining teeth, teeth whitening procedures from a renowned specialist like Dr. Eric Mehler are necessary.
To get your teeth whitened, you can avail two options: One is you can yourself visit the clinic of Dr. Eric Mehler or can get the teeth whitening kits from the clinic and follow a DIY route to whiten your teeth at the luxury of your home.
When you opt for the in-office teeth whitening procedure, your teeth will undergo the following steps:

  • The experienced and skilled team of dentists of Dr. Eric Mehler will apply a layer of highly concentrated peroxide gel carefully on your teeth.
  • After 20 minutes, the gel is removed.
  • As the gel is removed, you will see a dramatic change in the color of your teeth. You will notice the stains and yellow patches on your teeth have faded and your teeth have started glowing more than before.
  • If you notice that the discoloration is still persistent, then the team of efficient dentists of Dr. Eric Mehler will recommend another method for teeth whitening.

If you can’t make regular visits to the clinic, then the home kit for teeth whitening procedures is given to you. This kit is equipped with a highly concentrated peroxide gel and mouth guards. You just have to apply the concentrated peroxide gel with care for a span of just an hour and you will notice the dramatic change in the color of your teeth.

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We take pride in providing the best dental care service at our cosmetic Dentistry in Florida

While Usually Benign, Lichen Planus Lesions Should Still be Examined

If you’ve noticed a small sore in your mouth, it’s possible you have a non-contagious disease known as lichen planus. Although usually benign, it’s still a good idea to have it examined and monitored.

Bondings

The condition is so named because its lesions are similar in appearance to lichen, the algae and fungi organism often found on rocks and trees. It’s believed to be a type of autoimmune disease, in which the body treats some of its own cells as foreign and reacts adversely to them. Certain medications and substances may also cause a lichenoid reaction. Besides the inner cheeks, gums or tongue, lichen planus may also appear on other skin or mucous surfaces on the wrists, legs or fingernails.

When it appears inside the mouth it usually resembles a lacy pattern of white lines or ulceration. Gum tissues may become red and inflamed, with some soreness after brushing or eating. Although there’s no known cure for lichen planus, it rarely causes serious problems — in fact, you may not even be aware you have the condition unless pointed out during a dental exam. It may, in time, fade away.

If the lesions do become bothersome (painful, itchy or overly-sensitive), there are some ways to ease discomfort: brushing with a soft toothbrush (to minimize irritation), flossing, and avoiding acidic or spicy foods and beverages which have been known to cause flare-ups. Managing stress is also helpful, and a topical steroid may be prescribed for more severe outbreaks.

Perhaps the greatest concern with lichen planus, though, is it may resemble more serious conditions, particularly oral cancer. The only way to be certain that it is a benign condition is to perform a biopsy on some of the affected tissue. If you notice a problem, be sure to visit us for a complete examination. And regardless of whether you have the condition or not, regular oral cancer screenings, as well as limits on alcohol consumption and stopping use of tobacco, will also reduce your risk of oral cancer.

Odds are if you have a case of lichen planus it isn’t causing you any problems. If it does cause you discomfort, though, you can take steps to ease your symptoms.

If you would like more information on lichen planus and similar oral conditions, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.

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Dr. Eric Mehler DDS is a dentist in Sunrise offering general and cosmetic dentistry and restorative dental care

Kristin Cavallari’s “Spaghetti Catcher” – First Step To A Winning Smile

Kristin Cavallari’s flawless smile has been featured on TV, film and magazine covers. But the 25-year-old actress and reality-show personality didn’t always have a perfect set of teeth. In fact, she told Dear Doctor magazine — where readers recently voted to crown her with the “Smile of the Year” award — that her dental treatments began the same way many do: with orthodontics in sixth grade.

“I had the ‘spaghetti catcher,’ which is what everyone used to call it,” she reminisced. But by that, she didn’t mean a strainer — she’s talking about what dentists call a “palatal expander.”

In case you’re not familiar with this orthodontic device, a palatal expander takes advantage of the natural growth patterns of a child’s upper jaw to create additional space for the top set of teeth. How does it work? Basically, it’s similar to braces: By applying gentle pressure, the appliance creates changes in the jaw. Unlike braces, however, it’s invisible — it fits between the upper teeth, close to the roof of the mouth.

During the three to six months a child wears the palatal expander, it pushes the left and right halves of the upper jawbone apart, and then maintains and stabilizes the new, wider spacing. Since the palatal bones don’t fuse until after puberty, tightening it a little bit each day for the first few weeks provides a quick and painless method of making the upper jaw a bit roomier. And that can be a very good thing. Why?

There are lots of reasons. For one, it can relieve the condition called “crowding,” when there is not enough space in the upper jaw to accommodate the proper alignment of the permanent teeth. In the past, teeth often had to be extracted in that situation. It may even allow “impacted” teeth — ones which are blocked from erupting by other teeth — to come in normally.

It can help treat a “crossbite,” when the back top teeth come down to bite inside (instead of outside) the lower back teeth. It also generally shortens the total time a child needs for orthodontic treatment. That’s good news for any teenager — even if their own day-to-day “reality show” isn’t featured on TV!

If you would like more information about palatal expanders, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Palatal Expanders” and “Early Orthodontic Evaluation.”

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Cosmetic Dentists Offer Dental Implants, Porcelain Veneers and Additional Cosmetic Dental Needs In Tamarac,FL

How Modern Dental Fillings Mimic Real Teeth

Until recently anyone who needed to repair cavities in his or her teeth ended up with a mouth full of “silver” fillings. Dental amalgam, which has a silver appearance, was the tooth restoration material of choice. Amalgam, a combination of metals including silver, mercury, and other metals, is still used — but today there are other options that mimic the original teeth they are restoring.

You may have read about some people’s concerns about the mercury used in dental amalgam. According to the American Dental Association (ADA), scientific studies have found no ill effects arising from using dental amalgam in fillings for adults or children: “While questions have arisen about the safety of dental amalgam relating to its mercury content, the major US and international scientific and health bodies, including the National Institutes of Health, the US Public Health Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Food and Drug Administration and the World Health Organization, among others have been satisfied that dental amalgam is a safe, reliable and effective restorative material.” Dental amalgam is still used for molars (back teeth) that must withstand heavy pressure from chewing.

For teeth that are more visible, materials that look and perform more like the original teeth — and are thus more pleasing in appearance — are now available. Dentistry is now taking a “biomimetic approach” (from words meaning “life mimicking”). The new materials — composite resins and porcelains — look like teeth because in many ways their structure imitates the biologic structure of teeth.

Composite resins are made of a plastic material (methacrylate) combined with fillers made of silica, a form of glass. They are able to bond to natural tooth structure and resemble the dentin, the inner layer of the tooth, which has a porous structure similar to bone.

Dental porcelains are a form of ceramic. They are non-metallic materials formed by the action of heat, like the ceramics used in porcelain cups and bowls. They come in a powder form that is mixed with water, shaped, and then placed in an oven until they reach the proper hardness. The end product is translucent and very hard, resembling the densely packed crystals of calcium that make up a tooth’s normal outer layer, the enamel.

The old amalgam fillings required removal of tooth material to prepare a site in which they could be placed. Composite resins and porcelains can be used to treat teeth that have small or large amounts of damage to their natural substance because the materials bond directly to the remaining dentin and enamel. Thus they end up stabilizing and strengthening the restored tooth, as well as providing a natural-looking appearance.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss your questions about tooth colored fillings. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “The Natural Beauty of Tooth Colored Fillings.”

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Actress Blythe Danner Is a Leader in the Fight Against Oral Cancer

After her husband, producer Bruce Paltrow, succumbed to oral cancer in 2002, actress Blythe Danner made it her mission to help save other families from the heartache she and her children (Jake and Gwyneth Paltrow) suffered with his loss. Now active with the Oral Cancer Foundation, Blythe uses her fame to bring awareness to the disease, which she says she and her family knew very little about before Bruce received his diagnosis.

In an interview with People magazine, Blythe said she believes her husband’s cancer could have been detected earlier if the family had been alert to the symptoms.

“For months I had noticed Bruce’s voice was hoarse,” she said. “I started asking him to see a doctor. But he kept saying, ‘No, no, no, I’m fine.’ ”

When a lump became visible in his neck, he did go to the doctor and found he had a tumor in his throat. The cancer eventually spread to his lymph nodes. Compounding Blythe’s sadness is the feeling that she might have been able to do something to prevent her husband’s death.

“I feel tremendously guilty,” she told the magazine, noting that she wishes she had simply insisted her husband get himself checked out. “Education and early detection are so important,” she said of her campaign to raise awareness. “That’s why I’m doing this.”

Though Bruce Paltrow was a smoker, it’s important to note that young, non-smokers comprise the fastest-growing segment of the population being diagnosed with the disease. That’s because a sexually transmitted virus known as HPV16 is now a major cause of oral cancer.

Oral cancer screenings are yet another good reason to make regular semi-annual visits to the dentist. We have the training to notice oral abnormalities, and to monitor and/or biopsy any suspicious lesions. At your oral cancer screening, we will feel your neck for lumps and inspect your lips and all inside surfaces of the mouth, including the back of your throat.

Of course, if you or a loved one experience persistent hoarseness, white or red patches or other changes in your mouth or tongue that don’t go away in a few weeks, please don’t hesitate to come in and see us.

If you have any concerns about oral cancer, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more about the disease in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Oral Cancer.”

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Don’t Keep It A Secret: Tell Us About Your Dry Mouth

Millions of people suffer from mouth dryness, but most people just never talk about it. As your dental care providers, we don’t want you to keep it a secret anymore and mouth dryness really can be a problem.

Why? Saliva is a very important fluid that moisturizes, lubricates, and aids in the first stages of chewing and digestion. A normal flow of saliva provides antibacterial benefits that even protect against cavities by buffering the effects of acids. It can also make the surfaces of your teeth more vulnerable to abrasion and erosion. Without enough saliva, you may be especially at risk for not only tooth decay, but even yeast infections.

Causes of dryness include dehydration and even morning breath, both of which are normal. Smoking, alcohol and coffee drinking also cause dryness. It is also a side effect of many medications. Although mouth dryness is not a disease in itself, it could be a symptom of salivary gland or other systemic (general body) disease.

As a first step in the treatment, we will assess your situation by taking a detailed habit, diet, medical, and drug history to properly assess the cause and establish whether this is a local condition affecting only your mouth or an indication of a generalized bodily problem.

It’s always helpful to keep yourself well hydrated by simply drinking a sufficient amount of water every day and by using good daily oral hygiene to remove dental bacterial plaque. Chewing gum, especially containing Xylitol, will also help promote saliva flow and keep your mouth moist. Be careful not to suck on candy or mints, because they are likely to cause decay. There are also prescription medications that can be used to promote more saliva flow.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment or to discuss your dry mouth and what we can do to help. For more information read the article on Dry Mouth in Dear Doctor magazine.

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Kelly Clarkson Gets to the Root of the Problem

Now that celebrities can communicate directly with their fans through social media, we’ve started to see dispatches from some surprising locations — the dental chair, for example! Take singer Kelly Clarkson, who was the first winner of American Idol, and perhaps one of the first to seek moral support via social media before having an emergency root canal procedure.

“Emergency root canal — I’ve had better days,” Kelly posted on her Facebook page, along with a photo of herself looking… well, pretty nervous. But is a root canal procedure really something to be scared about? It’s time to clear up some misconceptions about this very common dental procedure.

First of all, root canal treatment is done to save a tooth that might otherwise be lost to an infection deep inside it. So while it’s often looked upon with apprehension, it’s a very positive step to take if you want to keep your teeth as long as possible. Secondly, tooth infections can be painful — but it’s the root canal procedure that stops the pain. What, actually, is done during this tooth-saving treatment?

First, a local anesthetic is administered to keep you from feeling any pain. Then, a small opening is made through the chewing surface of the infected tooth, giving access to the central space inside, which is called the “pulp chamber.” A set of tiny instruments is used to remove the diseased pulp (nerve) tissue in the chamber, and to clean out the root canals: branching tunnel-like spaces that run from the pulp chamber through the root (or roots) of the tooth. The cleared canals are then filled and sealed.

At a later appointment, we will give you a more permanent filling or, more likely, a crown, to restore your tooth’s full function and protect it from further injury. A tooth that has had a root canal followed by a proper restoration can last as long as any other natural tooth — a very long time indeed.

If you have any questions about root canal treatment, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “A Step by Step Guide to Root Canal Treatment.”

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FAQS About Getting Dentures

Eric Mehler DDS is a general dentist serving the Sunrise, FL area with quality care. One of the services that his patients want to know more about is dentures. Dentures are replacement teeth that can help patients “reclaim” their smiles. Here are a few FAQs (frequently asked questions) about getting dentures that can help you make a decision about getting them for yourself or someone you love.

How Are Dentures Made?
Dentures are special dental appliances that are created to comfortably fit over the gums of the mouth when a patient has missing teeth. Full dentures cover the entire gumline while partials cover a smaller space and hook onto the remaining teeth. They are made in a laboratory from a material designed to simulate pink gums. The white artificial teeth (usually made of acrylic) are carefully placed in the base to complete the appliance.

How Long Does it Take to Get Dentures?
The first appointment to get your dentures is necessary to take impressions of your mouth and to also ensure that your gums are healthy and clean. Allow a few weeks for the first denture to come back—then you’ll have to go through a series of fittings until they’re just right. Ask your Sunrise, FL dentist if you can have a temporary device made while you wait.

Is There an Alternative to Dentures?
There are other alternatives that you might want to explore with Dr. Mehler at your initial consultation. Dental implantation is a popular service that provides you with a more permanent solution. When there are just one or two missing teeth, bridgework may be the solution (two crowns with a fill-in tooth in the middle).

Dentures by Dr. Mehler
If you think it’s time to get your very own custom dentures or you want to talk about additional solutions, call on Dr. Eric Mehler. He is committed to delivering “gentle, compassionate care” to his Sunrise, FL patients. Pick up the phone and dial (954) 741-5006 or click the “Request an Appointment” button to suggest a time online.

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Issues to Consider Before Dental Implants

With their durability, versatility and life-likeness, there’s no doubt dental implants have revolutionized teeth replacement. If you’re considering dental implants, however, there are some issues that could impact how and when you receive implants, or if you should consider another type of restoration.

Cost. Dental implants are initially more expensive than other tooth restorations, especially for multiple tooth replacement. However, be sure you consider the projected cost over the long-term, not just installation costs. Because of their durability, implants can last decades with little maintenance cost. In the long run, you may actually pay more for dental care with other types of restorations.

Bone health. Dental implants depend on a certain amount of bone to properly situate them for the best crown placement. If you’ve experienced extensive bone loss, however, there may not be enough to support the implant. This can often be overcome with grafting — immediately after extraction, at the time of implantation or a few months before implantation — to encourage bone growth. In some cases, though, bone loss may be so extensive you may need to consider an alternative restoration.

Gum Health. While implants themselves are impervious to infection, they’re supported by gum and bone tissues that can be affected. Infected tissues around an implant could eventually detach and lead to implant failure. If you have periodontal (gum) disease, we must first bring it under control and render your gums infection-free before installing implants. It’s also important to maintain effective oral hygiene and regular dental cleanings and checkups for optimum implant health.

Complications from osteoporosis. People with osteoporosis — in which the bones lose bone density and are more prone to fracture — are often treated with drugs known as bisphosphonates. In less than 1% of cases of long-term use, a patient may develop osteonecrosis in which the bone in the jaw may lose its vitality and die. As with bone loss, this condition could make implant placement difficult or impractical. Most dentists recommend stopping treatment of bisphosphonates for about three months before implant surgery.

If you have any of these issues or other complications with your oral health, be sure to discuss those with us before considering dental implants. With proper planning and care, most of these difficulties can be overcome for a successful outcome.

If you would like more information on pre-existing conditions that may affect implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Osteoporosis & Dental Implants” and “Infections around Implants.”

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